Cerebral Palsy

Healthcare Transition Research: Access to Care

Access to care for youth with special health care needs in the transition to adulthood. Lotstein DS, Inkelas M, Hays RD, Halfon N, Brook R.  Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024, USA. dlotstein@mednet.ucla.edu  J Adolesc Health. 2008 Jul;43(1):23-9. Epub 2008 Apr 25.  Comment in: J […]

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“I have chosen to live life abundantly”: perceptions of leisure by adults who use augmentative and alternative communication.

An online focus group was used to investigate perceptions of eight adults with cerebral palsy who used AAC systems about their recreation activities and leisure experiences. Six themes emerged from discussions on benefits of leisure and community recreation: improved physical health, enjoyment, improved mental health, increased independence, enhanced social connections, and education of society. Nine […]

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Growth and nutrition disorders in children with cerebral palsy.

Growth and nutrition disorders are common secondary health conditions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Poor growth and malnutrition in CP merit study because of their impact on health, including psychological and physiological function, healthcare utilization, societal participation, motor function, and survival. Understanding the etiology of poor growth has led to a variety of interventions […]

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Growth and nutritional status in residential center versus home-living children and adolescents with quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

OBJECTIVE: To describe growth and nutrition in nonambulatory youth (<19 years of age) with cerebral palsy (CP) living in residential centers compared with similar youth living at home. STUDY DESIGN: A multicenter, cross-sectional, single observational assessment of 75 subjects living in a residential care facility compared with 205 subjects living at home. Primary outcome measures […]

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Activity, activity, activity: rethinking our physical therapy approach to cerebral palsy.

This perspective outlines the theoretical basis for the presentation with the same name as the second part of this title, which was given at the III STEP conference in July 2005. It elaborates on the take-home message from that talk, which was to promote activity in children and adults with cerebral palsy and other central […]

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Gastrostomy feeding in cerebral palsy: too much of a good thing?

Gastrostomy tube (GT) feeding in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is associated with significant increases in weight gain and, potentially, with overfeeding. This study aimed to measure energy balance and body composition in children with CP who were fed either orally or by GT. Forty children (27 males, 13 females; median age 8y 6mo; range […]

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Eating and feeding are not the same: caregivers’ perceptions of gastrostomy feeding for children with cerebral palsy.

Using a semi-structured questionnaire, this descriptive study examined perceptions of feeding and adherence to feeding recommendations for caregivers (26 females; mean age 32y 7mo [SD 9.4y], range 20-59y) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and a gastrostomy tube (GT). Children in the study (15 females, 11 males; mean age 4y 8mo [SD 3y 11mo], range […]

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How might districts identify local barriers to participation for children with cerebral palsy?

OBJECTIVES: To explore how data about participation and the local environment might be used to identify barriers to participation for children with cerebral palsy. METHODS: Participation is measured at 5 years of age using the six domains of the lifestyle assessment questionnaire. Individual child score profiles are compared with expected patterns from similar children and […]

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The health and well-being of caregivers of children with cerebral palsy.

OBJECTIVE: Most children enjoy healthy childhoods with little need for specialized health care services. However, some children experience difficulties in early childhood and require access to and utilization of considerable health care resources over time. Although impaired motor function is the hallmark of the cerebral palsy (CP) syndromes, many children with this development disorder also […]

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Aging with cerebral palsy.

Before the mid-twentieth century, few people with CP survived to adulthood. Now, 65% to 90% of children with CP survive. Because of improvements in intensive care techniques leading to the increased survival of very low-birth-weight infants and the increased longevity of the general population, there are a large number of disabled adults requiring medical care. […]

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