Health Promotion Curricula in CDC Funded States: Montana

Living Well With A Disability—MT

 

Target Audience     

Adults with Physical Disabilities

 

Living Well with a Disability is an eight-week 16-hour health promotion workshop for people with disabilities and chronic illnesses. It is based on research designed to reduce the occurrence of secondary conditions or health-related conditions that develop as a result of a person’s original disability or chronic illness. Secondary conditions can vary from pressure sores or physical deconditioning, to isolation due to lack of accessibility or depression. Learning to manage one’s secondary conditions can lead to greater independence and desired levels of participation.  The Living Well workshop is provided by the Montana Centers for Independent Living (CIL) and is usually scheduled either at the CIL itself or another designated location. Participants attend as many of the sessions as possible and work through the curriculum with facilitators and a group of eight to ten participants. At the first session, participants receive a copy of the Living Well curriculum to keep. Facilitators guide participants through the program encouraging discussion, answering questions, and helping participants complete program exercises.  Standardized materials for evaluation of the program’s effectiveness are available on request.

 

Living Well with a Disability On-Line:  The RTC: Rural at The University of Montana offers the program on-line, for free.  This accessible program uses narrated slide shows and written exercises to improve one’s health and life  (www.livingwellweb.com/2005). To access program materials, participants need to complete a brief online survey.

 

Materials Utilized    

The Living Well with a Disability program is based on a curriculum that can be purchased from the program coordinator for $22 per book (S & H included).   The curriculum is available in large print, Braille and ascii text.

 

Contact Information           

Craig Ravesloot, Project Director, Montana Disability and Health Program
The University of Montana Rural Institute

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities
52 Corbin Hall
Missoula, MT 59812-7056

406-370-6840

cravesloot@comcast.net
Website         http://www.livingwellweb.com

http://rtc.ruralinstitute.umt.edu ; http://mtdh.ruralinstitute.umt.edu

 

 

Have Healthy Teeth—MT

 

Target Audience                 

Adults with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) Living in Supported Environments

 

This peer-support program improves oral health behaviors of adults with I/DD and is delivered through the network of People First chapters, a national self-advocacy organization funded by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities.  The Have Healthy Teeth pilot study results indicated that brushing twice daily for two minutes each time significantly improved participants’ scores on

oral health screens for plaque, gingivitis, and debris, and the peer support system effectively maintained consistent oral health behaviors at little cost. Program implementation in each site involved:  1) Montana Disability and Health Program staff training a Program Facilitator, usually the local People First coordinator, 2) trained facilitators presenting Have Healthy Teeth to interested adults with I/DD, 3) consenting participants recruiting a mentor (family member, significant other, or friend) and undergoing a donated dental screening to identify acute needs and establish a baseline for program evaluation, 4) a local dental hygienist educating participants and mentors in proper brushing technique, 5) five to seven days per week, peer mentors prompting participants to brush properly for two minutes, twice a day, 6) each participant keeping a daily Brushing Log and undergoing a 24- and 52-week follow-up oral health screening.

 

Materials Utilized    

Have Healthy Teeth utilizes a Facilitator’s Handbook to train program facilitators in each targeted city. Program participants receive several types of environmental supports including Brushing Logs, 30-second timers, and laminated tooth brushing instructions. Peer mentors utilize Peer Prompt logs to record their activities. Oral health screens formatted on 2 pages are utilized by the dental hygienists.

 

Contact Information           

Donna Bainbridge, Ph.D.
Montana Disability and Health Program

The University of Montana Rural Institute
52 Corbin Hall
Missoula, MT 59812

406-243-5741

dbridge@ruralinstitute.umt.edu

 

Website         http://mtdh.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/OurPlan.htm

 

 

Materials Supporting Education and Nutrition of Adults with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) (MENU-AIDDs)–MT

 

Target Audience      Adults with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities             

 

MENU-AIDDs is a nutrition education and supports program for staff of group homes for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities and includes nutrition education and guidelines, standards of care and relevant regulations, menu and meal planning, and grocery shopping and cooking guidelines designed to meet  the special needs of individuals with I/DD. Pilot testing of MENU-AIDDs in four adult group homes showed these outcomes for individuals with I/DD:  1) menus and foods served in homes improved, with significant gains in all Food Guide Pyramid and Dietary Guidelines goal areas, 2) portion sizes were adequate and appropriate, 3) both overweight and underweight individuals  improved their weight status, 4) gastrointestinal health improved, with less bowel obstruction, constipation, diarrhea and loose stools, 5) staff time and food costs were acceptable, and 6) managers, staff and residents readily adopted the program and gave it high ratings. Dissemination is underway statewide in Montana. Montana Disability and Health Program staffs are working with the CDC to disseminate MENU-AIDDs nationally.

 

Materials Utilized     Nutrition Standards of Care available at http://mtdh.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/Publications/StandardsStaff.htm and Eat Well to Feel Well: Your Plan for Good Health fact sheet available at http://mtdh.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/Publications/EatWell.htm

 

Contact Information           

Kathy Humphries, Ph.D.

Montana Disability and Health Program

The University of Montana Rural Institute
52 Corbin Hall
Missoula, MT 59812

406-243-2515

khumphries@ruralinstitute.umt.edu

 

Website         http://mtdh.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/OurPlan.htm